"Fun I love, but too much fun is of all things the most loathsome. Mirth is better than fun, and happiness is better than mirth." — William Blake

Dapper dragons.

Artists are, in order:

  1. Sean Poppe, http://beardedruckus.tumblr.com
  2. Jordan Kotzebue, http://kotzebue.tumblr.com
  3. Caanan Grall, http://occasionalcomics.com
  4. Jesse Nylund, http://completelyseriouscomics.com
  5. Ed Siomacco, http://edsiomacco.tumblr.com
  6. Sally Jane Thompson, http://www.sallyjanethompson.co.uk

damnitfeelsgoodtobeafangirl:

Another Magical Viking Girl!

Took some influence from the Varangian guard armors but just put it on an adorable badass with an axe.

I also like the idea of the girls getting bigger, taller and tougher when they transform <3 


6,200 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
#magical girls    #girls    #art    #Character Design    #vikings    #aww yeaaah    

secondlina:

"Nope", the anime.

Based on that hilarious text post.


298,584 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
#art    #comics    #magical girls    #girls    #writing    #genre    #anime    #manga    
toerning:

I really try to keep my comments short here so I’ve just written and deleted, like, 20 paragraphs.
Basically this is the main character of a story I am not skilled enough to write, but it’s basically what happens after the big final showdown.  She’s an amalgamation of all the Chosen Ones of recent YA literature, and the story is just her, like, coping with the fact that her entire life leading up till now has been about carrying out her destiny, beating the big baddie and everything and now…she’s got to deal with living the rest of her life.  Which, as we all know, is fucking hard enough as is.
In an ideal world, Rainbow Rowell would write this. 

toerning:

I really try to keep my comments short here so I’ve just written and deleted, like, 20 paragraphs.

Basically this is the main character of a story I am not skilled enough to write, but it’s basically what happens after the big final showdown.  She’s an amalgamation of all the Chosen Ones of recent YA literature, and the story is just her, like, coping with the fact that her entire life leading up till now has been about carrying out her destiny, beating the big baddie and everything and now…she’s got to deal with living the rest of her life.  Which, as we all know, is fucking hard enough as is.

In an ideal world, Rainbow Rowell would write this. 


10,629 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
#writing    #art    #sketches    #girls    #magical girls    #ya series    #Character Design    #mental health    #mental conditions    

Anonymous said: When you were a student, as an artist, do you ever had those periods in which you thought you were never gonna achieve anything in life and your future was the darkest thing you could think about? If so how did you ever overcame them so you could be the amazing artist you are now? I´m having a pretty bad series of events with my art in Graphic Design and hope just flies away **literally it grew wings and flew**

nicholaskole:

Yes.

Oh yes yes.
Art-angst is a familiar country to me- I know the lay of that dim and soggy land all too well.

I go through periodic dry spells- especially with my personal work, where I just seem to fall out of love with art-making and can’t think of anything I want to draw.
But I’ve learned over the last years that those moments are temporary; the feeling vanishes and inspiration comes again. 
Lack of inspiration and self-doubt are normal, but it’s important to know that they aren’t the final word on your career as an art-maker. 

When that happens, I do two things: One I call the Kiki Method (from Kiki’s Delivery Service). When Kiki loses her powers, her friend Ursula compares her experiences with painting and inspiration to Kiki’s magic:

I stop drawing. I take walks, look at the scenery, take naps, do nothing. Then after a while, all of a sudden I get the urge to draw again.”

There is more to life than art- than what you do- and it is important to remember that.

So take a break, let the pressure slip away- often art-block is the result of an overgrown feeling of responsibility, pressure and expectations of yourself: the fear of failure. You’re afraid you’ll make bad art, so you stop making any art at all.

But that’s the worst bit!
The only way through to making better art is by making the bad art first. All of it. You have to make every little bit of bad art that is in you before it gets better. 
Don’t be afraid- it’s okay to be not-amazing!

Which leads me to the second thing: give yourself permission to suck, and then push steadily ahead. 

Accept that every sketch you sketch won’t be the best thing ever- but make them anyways. Make them all, discipline yourself to sketch onward, fill pages with unviewable garbage. It will help, I promise- because you’ll be doing something, moving forward. And suddenly it won’t be about how you feel anymore, or whether you’re inspired. 
Sometimes it’s just about pressing on. 
Sometimes it’s about accepting as graciously as you can that you’re not the best- but that the only way to get better is to keep going- to keep not-being-the-best. I’m not the best either. You’re in good company :)
But don’t give up, whatever you do. Giving up is the only surefire way to make sure you fail. 

With all love: Hang in there- I know it sucks sometimes. Take a break, remember all the beautiful things and people you have in your life, then come back and move slowly, steadily forward. You got this.

184 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
#art    #confidence    #productivity    #inspiration    #creativity    #motivation    
beeinherbonnet:

“The probability of separate worlds meeting is very small. The lure of it is immense. We send starships. We fall in love.”  
- Jeanette Winterson

beeinherbonnet:

“The probability of separate worlds meeting is very small. The lure of it is immense. We send starships. We fall in love.”  

- Jeanette Winterson


67,840 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
#art    #painting    #watercolours    #colouring    #quotations    #love    #holy fuck    #this is amazing    #cosmos    #writing    

Besides the fact that Calvin and Hobbes is the comic I cherish above all others, Bill Watterson is my biggest creative influence and someone I admire greatly as an artist. Here’s why:

• After getting fired as a political cartoonist at the Cincinnati Post, Watterson decided to instead focus on comic strips. Broke, he was forced to move back in with his parents and worked an advertising layout job he hated while he drew comics in his spare time. He stayed at this miserable job and submitted strips to comic syndicates for four years before Calvin and Hobbes was accepted. About this period Watterson wrote: “The only way to learn how to write and draw is by writing and drawing … to persist in the face of continual rejection requires a deep love of the work itself, and learning that lesson kept me from ever taking Calvin and Hobbes for granted when the strip took off years later.” (Also see the Advice for Beginners comic.)

• Watterson sacrificed millions (probably hundreds of millions) of dollars by never licensing and merchandising Calvin and Hobbes. He went through a long and traumatic fight with his syndicate over the licensing rights, and although he eventually prevailed, Watterson was so disillusioned with the industry he almost quit cartooning. “I worked too long to get this job, and worked too hard once I got it, to let other people run away with my creation once it became successful. If I could not control what my own work was about and stood for, then cartooning meant very little to me.”

• Luckily Watterson didn’t quit and took a sabbatical instead. Eager to reinvigorate his creative mojo on his return, Watteron proposed a radical new layout for his colour Sunday strips. For those not familiar with comic strip lingo, each week a newspaper comic will have six ‘daily’ strips (usually black and white, one tier, 3-4 panels) and one ‘Sunday’ strip which is larger and in colour. Previously, the Sunday strip was comprised of three tiers of panels and looked like this. The layout was restrictive and the top tier had to be completely disposable because a lot of newspapers would cut it and only run the bottom two tiers in order to save space so they could cram in as many comics (or puzzles, or ads) as they could.

Watterson was sick of the format restraints and wanted more space to experiment and push his storytelling ability so he (with his syndicate’s support) gave newspaper editors a ballsy proposition. They would have to publish his Sunday comics at a half-page size with no editing, or not publish it at all. By this time Calvin and Hobbes had been running for over five years and was extremely successful so Watterson had the clout needed to pull this move off. Despite fearing many cancellations, he was pleasantly surprised that most newspapers supported the change. Free of the shackles of tiers and panel restrictions, Watterson gave us visually exciting and beautiful strips that hadn’t been since the glory days of newspaper comics in the 1920s and 30s. He was free to create strips like this, and this and this. “The last few years of the strip, and especially the Sundays, are the work I am the most proud of. This was close as I could get to my vision of what a comic strip should be.”

• After working on the strip for 10 years, when Calvin and Hobbes was at the height of its popularity and was being published in over 2,000 newspapers, Watterson stopped. He had given his heart and soul to one project for 10 years, had said all he wanted to say and wanted to go out on top. “I did not want Calvin and Hobbes to coast into half-hearted repetition, as so many long-running strips do. I was ready to pursue different artistic challenges, work at a less frantic pace with fewer business conflicts, and … start restoring some balance to my life.” Since retiring the strip, Watterson has pursued his interest in painting and music.

It’s pretty incredible when you think about. Could you say ‘no’ to millions, I repeat, MILLIONS of dollars of merchandise money? I don’t know if I could. Would you stop creating your art if millions of people admired your work and kept wanting more? I don’t know if I would.

Reprints of Calvin and Hobbes are still published in over 50 countries and the strips are as fresh and funny as they were 20-25 years ago. It has a timeless quality and will continue to entertain comic fans for generations to come. Great art does that.

- The quote used in the comic is taken from a graduation speech Watterson gave at his alma mater, Kenyon College, in 1990.
Brain Pickings has a nice article about it. The comic is basically the story of my life, except I’m a stay-at-home-dad to two dogs. My ex-boss even asked me if I wanted to return to my old job.
- My original dream was to become a successful newspaper comic strip artist and create the next Calvin and Hobbes. That job almost doesn’t exist anymore as newspapers continue to disappear and the comics section gets smaller and smaller, often getting squeezed out of newspapers entirely. I spent years sending submissions to syndicates in my early 20s and still have the rejection letters somewhere. I eventually realised it was a fool’s dream (also, my work was nowhere near good enough) and decided webcomics was the place to be. It’s mouth-watering to imagine what Watterson could achieve with webcomics, given the infinite possibilities of the online medium.
- My style is already influenced by Watterson, but this is the first time I’ve intentionally tried to mimic his work. It’s been fun poring through Calvin and Hobbes strips the past week while working on this comic and it was a humbling reminder that I still have a long way to go.
- The quotes I’ve used in the write-up above are taken from the introduction to The Complete Calvin and Hobbes collection, which sits proudly on my desk.

128. BILL WATTERSON: A cartoonist’s advice


6 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
#comics    #art    #advice    #webcomics    #i really needed that    #quotations    

frantabulosa:

daggomusprime:

This made me laugh and then cry and then

You know what. If you really think about it this man knew the mind of most artists.

He knew that most of us lack a lot of self confidence and are scared of making mistakes and so on. He knew that those fears are the ones that keep us from grown and becoming better artists. He knew that if we focused in the good we would keep moving forward without ever looking back or dwelling on our mistakes.

That or I’m over-thinking it. :0

image

(Source: bourbonbadger)


132,039 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
#art    #advice    #quotations    #inspiration    #motivation    

How to Prevent Watercolor Paper from Curling

If only I had known this years ago.


2 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
#painting    #watercolor    #watercolour    #art    #technique    

paperseverywhere:

erykdonovan:

Perspective Grid 101!

I’ve had a few people ask me about perspective, so I figured it was time I just did one of these tutorials and did a step by step.

I hope it makes sense to people!

A couple of notes on this -

1. There are a number of different ways to make grids. This is what I do, and it works for me. I have found this to personally be the easiest method, however if something else works better for you, use it!

2. This tutorial is designed for people who work traditionally. If you do your drawing in photoshop or manga studio, there are many quicker and more effective ways to make grids. I do all of my drawing on paper, and so this method is very useful for me.

3. Despite the appearance, this is actually really fast once you get the hang of it. Yes, it’s still faster in photoshop, but I can easily make a good grid on my page in less that 5 minutes, often under 2. The more you practice and understand the basic concept, you’ll figure out ways other ways to use it, and it will become like second nature. When I first started it often took me 20 minutes or more.

4. Feel free to share this, if you want to use it elsewhere, ask me first! If I can help people make better comics, I’m all for it!

This Tutorial ©ErykDonovan

Incredibly handy, thank you.


16,708 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
#tutorials    #drawing    #art    #perspective    
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