"Fun I love, but too much fun is of all things the most loathsome. Mirth is better than fun, and happiness is better than mirth." — William Blake

Otoyomegatari / A Bride’s Story hits pretty much every one of my topical, narrative, and art pings in beautiful, sequential order. Check it out here, and remember to buy the English publications to support the author!


105 notes | Reblog
11 months ago
#art    #manga    #otoyomegatari    #comics    #storytelling    #humanities    #history    #turkmenistan    #mori kaoru    

letsplayauochat:

“King…?”

"Gilgamesh was the fifth king of Uruk, modern day Iraq, placing his reign ca. 2500 BC.”

"Gilgamesh was the fifth king of Uruk, modern day Iraq, placing his reign ca. 2500 BC.”

"Gilgamesh was the fifth king of Uruk, modern day Iraq, placing his reign ca. 2500 BC.”

Alulim's got something to say about that “oldest king” bit, Gilgy.

also why is he a blonde white guy in that case


deerkick:

pleasegoaway:

click to read article

This is the wonderful letter I will henceforth direct people to when asked why we should continue funding space technology instead of other, more directly humanitarian efforts.

deerkick:

pleasegoaway:

click to read article

This is the wonderful letter I will henceforth direct people to when asked why we should continue funding space technology instead of other, more directly humanitarian efforts.

6 notes | Reblog
1 year ago
#space    #science    #science sunday    #NASA    #human rights    #humanities    
stfuconservatives:

ideasandopinions:

Colorblind Ideology is a Form of Racism
What is racial colorblindness?
Racial issues are often uncomfortable to discuss and rife with stress and controversy. Many ideas have been advanced to address this sore spot in the American psyche. Currently, the most pervasive approach is known as colorblindness. Colorblindness is the racial ideology that posits the best way to end discrimination is by treating individuals as equally as possible, without regard to race, culture, or ethnicity.
At its face value, colorblindness seems like a good thing — really taking MLK seriously on his call to judge people on the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. It focuses on commonalities between people, such as their shared humanity.
However, colorblindness alone is not sufficient to heal racial wounds on a national or personal level. It is only a half-measure that in the end operates as a form of racism.
Problems with the colorblind approach
Racism? Strong words, yes, but let’s look the issue straight in its partially unseeing eye. In a colorblind society, White people, who are unlikely to experience disadvantages due to race, can effectively ignore racism in American life, justify the current social order, and feel more comfortable with their relatively privileged standing in society (Fryberg, 2010). Most minorities, however, who regularly encounter difficulties due to race, experience colorblind ideologies quite differently. Colorblindness creates a society that denies their negative racial experiences, rejects their cultural heritage, and invalidates their unique perspectives.
Let’s break it down into simple terms: Color-Blind = “People of color — we don’t see you (at least not that bad ‘colored’ part).” As a person of color, I like who I am, and I don’t want any aspect of that to be unseen or invisible. The need for colorblindness implies there is something shameful about the way God made me and the culture I was born into that we shouldn’t talk about. Thus, colorblindness has helped make race into a taboo topic that polite people cannot openly discuss. And if you can’t talk about it, you can’t understand it, much less fix the racial problems that plague our society.
Colorblindness is not the answer
Many Americans view colorblindness as helpful to people of color by asserting that race does not matter (Tarca, 2005). But in America, most underrepresented minorities will explain that race does matter, as it affects opportunities, perceptions, income, and so much more. When race-related problems arise, colorblindness tends to individualize conflicts and shortcomings, rather than examining the larger picture with cultural differences, stereotypes, and values placed into context. Instead of resulting from an enlightened (albeit well-meaning) position, colorblindness comes from a lack of awareness of racial privilege conferred by Whiteness (Tarca, 2005). White people can guiltlessly subscribe to colorblindness because they are usually unaware of how race affects people of color and American society as a whole.
Colorblindness in a psychotherapeutic relationship
How might colorblindness cause harm? Here’s an example close to home for those of you who are psychologically-minded. In the not-so-distant past, in psychotherapy a client’s racial and ethnic remarks were viewed as a defensive shift away from important issues, and the therapist tended to interpret this as resistance (Comas-Diaz & Jacobsen, 1991). However, such an approach hinders the exploration of conflicts related to race, ethnicity, and culture. The therapist doesn’t see the whole picture, and the client is left frustrated.
A colorblind approach effectively does the same thing. Blind means not being able to see things. I don’t want to be blind. I want to see things clearly, even if they make me uncomfortable. As a therapist I need to be able to hear and “see” everything my client is communicating on many different levels. I can’t afford to be blind to anything. Would you want to see a surgeon who operated blindfolded? Of course not. Likewise, a therapist should not be blinded either, especially to something as critical as a person’s culture or racial identity. By encouraging the exploration of racial and cultural concepts, the therapist can provide a more authentic opportunity to understand and resolve the client’s problems (Comas-Diaz & Jacobsen, 1991).
Nonetheless, I have encountered many fellow therapists who ascribe to a colorblind philosophy. They ignore race or pretend its personal, social, and historical effects don’t exist. This approach ignores the incredibly salient experience of being stigmatized by society and represents an empathetic failure on the part of the therapist. Colorblindness does not foster equality or respect; it merely relieves the therapist of his or her obligation to address important racial differences and difficulties.
Multiculturalism is better than blindness
Research has shown that hearing colorblind messages predict negative outcomes among Whites, such as greater racial bias and negative affect; likewise colorblind messages cause stress in ethnic minorities, resulting in decreased cognitive performance (Holoien et al., 2011). Given how much is at stake, we can no longer afford to be blind. It’s time for change and growth. It’s time to see.
The alternative to colorblindness is multiculturalism, an ideology that acknowledges, highlights, and celebrates ethnoracial differences. It recognizes that each tradition has something valuable to offer. It is not afraid to see how others have suffered as a result of racial conflict or differences.
So, how do we become multicultural? The following suggestions would make a good start (McCabe, 2011):
Recognizing and valuing differences,
Teaching and learning about differences, and
Fostering personal friendships and organizational alliances
Moving from colorblindness to multiculturalism is a process of change, and change is never easy, but we can’t afford to stay the same.
References
Comas-Diaz, L., and Jacobsen, F. M. (1991). Clinical Ethnocultural Transference and Countertransference in the Therapeutic Dyad. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 61(3), 392-402.
Fryberg, S. M. (2010). When the World Is Colorblind, American Indians Are Invisible: A Diversity Science Approach. Psychological Inquiry, 21(2), 115-119.
Holoien, D. S., and Shelton, J. N. (October 2011). You deplete me: The cognitive costs of colorblindness on ethnic minorities. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.09.010.
Tarca, K. (2005). Colorblind in Control: The Risks of Resisting Difference Amid Demographic Change. Educational Studies, 38(2), 99-120.
McCabe, J. (2011). Doing Multiculturalism: An Interactionist Analysis of the Practices of a Multicultural Sorority. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 40 (5), 521-549.

Reblogging for the next time I hear some “I don’t see race” “by acknowledging race exists, you’re the real racist” “you’re just further dividing us when we should be UNITED!!!” bullshit.

stfuconservatives:

ideasandopinions:

Colorblind Ideology is a Form of Racism

What is racial colorblindness?

Racial issues are often uncomfortable to discuss and rife with stress and controversy. Many ideas have been advanced to address this sore spot in the American psyche. Currently, the most pervasive approach is known as colorblindness. Colorblindness is the racial ideology that posits the best way to end discrimination is by treating individuals as equally as possible, without regard to race, culture, or ethnicity.

At its face value, colorblindness seems like a good thing — really taking MLK seriously on his call to judge people on the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. It focuses on commonalities between people, such as their shared humanity.

However, colorblindness alone is not sufficient to heal racial wounds on a national or personal level. It is only a half-measure that in the end operates as a form of racism.

Problems with the colorblind approach

Racism? Strong words, yes, but let’s look the issue straight in its partially unseeing eye. In a colorblind society, White people, who are unlikely to experience disadvantages due to race, can effectively ignore racism in American life, justify the current social order, and feel more comfortable with their relatively privileged standing in society (Fryberg, 2010). Most minorities, however, who regularly encounter difficulties due to race, experience colorblind ideologies quite differently. Colorblindness creates a society that denies their negative racial experiences, rejects their cultural heritage, and invalidates their unique perspectives.

Let’s break it down into simple terms: Color-Blind = “People of color — we don’t see you (at least not that bad ‘colored’ part).” As a person of color, I like who I am, and I don’t want any aspect of that to be unseen or invisible. The need for colorblindness implies there is something shameful about the way God made me and the culture I was born into that we shouldn’t talk about. Thus, colorblindness has helped make race into a taboo topic that polite people cannot openly discuss. And if you can’t talk about it, you can’t understand it, much less fix the racial problems that plague our society.

Colorblindness is not the answer

Many Americans view colorblindness as helpful to people of color by asserting that race does not matter (Tarca, 2005). But in America, most underrepresented minorities will explain that race does matter, as it affects opportunities, perceptions, income, and so much more. When race-related problems arise, colorblindness tends to individualize conflicts and shortcomings, rather than examining the larger picture with cultural differences, stereotypes, and values placed into context. Instead of resulting from an enlightened (albeit well-meaning) position, colorblindness comes from a lack of awareness of racial privilege conferred by Whiteness (Tarca, 2005). White people can guiltlessly subscribe to colorblindness because they are usually unaware of how race affects people of color and American society as a whole.

Colorblindness in a psychotherapeutic relationship

How might colorblindness cause harm? Here’s an example close to home for those of you who are psychologically-minded. In the not-so-distant past, in psychotherapy a client’s racial and ethnic remarks were viewed as a defensive shift away from important issues, and the therapist tended to interpret this as resistance (Comas-Diaz & Jacobsen, 1991). However, such an approach hinders the exploration of conflicts related to race, ethnicity, and culture. The therapist doesn’t see the whole picture, and the client is left frustrated.

A colorblind approach effectively does the same thing. Blind means not being able to see things. I don’t want to be blind. I want to see things clearly, even if they make me uncomfortable. As a therapist I need to be able to hear and “see” everything my client is communicating on many different levels. I can’t afford to be blind to anything. Would you want to see a surgeon who operated blindfolded? Of course not. Likewise, a therapist should not be blinded either, especially to something as critical as a person’s culture or racial identity. By encouraging the exploration of racial and cultural concepts, the therapist can provide a more authentic opportunity to understand and resolve the client’s problems (Comas-Diaz & Jacobsen, 1991).

Nonetheless, I have encountered many fellow therapists who ascribe to a colorblind philosophy. They ignore race or pretend its personal, social, and historical effects don’t exist. This approach ignores the incredibly salient experience of being stigmatized by society and represents an empathetic failure on the part of the therapist. Colorblindness does not foster equality or respect; it merely relieves the therapist of his or her obligation to address important racial differences and difficulties.

Multiculturalism is better than blindness

Research has shown that hearing colorblind messages predict negative outcomes among Whites, such as greater racial bias and negative affect; likewise colorblind messages cause stress in ethnic minorities, resulting in decreased cognitive performance (Holoien et al., 2011). Given how much is at stake, we can no longer afford to be blind. It’s time for change and growth. It’s time to see.

The alternative to colorblindness is multiculturalism, an ideology that acknowledges, highlights, and celebrates ethnoracial differences. It recognizes that each tradition has something valuable to offer. It is not afraid to see how others have suffered as a result of racial conflict or differences.

So, how do we become multicultural? The following suggestions would make a good start (McCabe, 2011):

  1. Recognizing and valuing differences,
  2. Teaching and learning about differences, and
  3. Fostering personal friendships and organizational alliances

Moving from colorblindness to multiculturalism is a process of change, and change is never easy, but we can’t afford to stay the same.

References

Comas-Diaz, L., and Jacobsen, F. M. (1991). Clinical Ethnocultural Transference and Countertransference in the Therapeutic Dyad. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 61(3), 392-402.

Fryberg, S. M. (2010). When the World Is Colorblind, American Indians Are Invisible: A Diversity Science Approach. Psychological Inquiry, 21(2), 115-119.

Holoien, D. S., and Shelton, J. N. (October 2011). You deplete me: The cognitive costs of colorblindness on ethnic minorities. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.09.010.

Tarca, K. (2005). Colorblind in Control: The Risks of Resisting Difference Amid Demographic Change. Educational Studies, 38(2), 99-120.

McCabe, J. (2011). Doing Multiculturalism: An Interactionist Analysis of the Practices of a Multicultural Sorority. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 40 (5), 521-549.

Reblogging for the next time I hear some “I don’t see race” “by acknowledging race exists, you’re the real racist” “you’re just further dividing us when we should be UNITED!!!” bullshit.


5,682 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#racism    #anthropology    #humanities    
asianhistory:

I’m sorry I’m posting this much later than I intended to! It was my roommate’s 21st birthday, so we had to take her to dinner, and throw a Disney movie party.
That said, this is Joseph Campbell’s Myths of Light: Eastern Metaphors of the Eternal. Jospeh Campbell is a rather famous historian known for his Hero’s Journey outline (which George Lucas used while making Star Wars). If you’re interested in Eastern Religion (Hinduism and Buddhism is mostly covered in this book) and the structure of these religious stories and myths, then I recommend this book. It’s a very entertaining book, with great writing and plenty of comparisons to western culture, as well as great explanations of each religion.

asianhistory:

I’m sorry I’m posting this much later than I intended to! It was my roommate’s 21st birthday, so we had to take her to dinner, and throw a Disney movie party.

That said, this is Joseph Campbell’s Myths of Light: Eastern Metaphors of the Eternal. Jospeh Campbell is a rather famous historian known for his Hero’s Journey outline (which George Lucas used while making Star Wars). If you’re interested in Eastern Religion (Hinduism and Buddhism is mostly covered in this book) and the structure of these religious stories and myths, then I recommend this book. It’s a very entertaining book, with great writing and plenty of comparisons to western culture, as well as great explanations of each religion.


26 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#Buddhism    #China    #Hinduism    #India    #Japan    #Religion    #humanities    #books    
micmit:

life:

A self-described “visual anthropologist” and social explorer, 27-year-old photographer Umair Jangda has created a remarkable series of images based on a simple, sneakily powerful concept: namely, that photographing Muslims of different ages and backgrounds dressed in both contemporary clothes and in traditional Islamic attire might well be one way to alter the perception of Islam in the West.

“After a bit of a false start with this project,” Jangda told LIFE.com, “I realized that, ironically, I needed to show the stereotype [of how Muslims appear to Western eyes] in order to to battle that stereotype.

LIFE.com presents a selection of images from Jangda’s work-in-progress: The Muslim Behind Islam. 

some really beautiful use of photography here

micmit:

life:

A self-described “visual anthropologist” and social explorer, 27-year-old photographer Umair Jangda has created a remarkable series of images based on a simple, sneakily powerful concept: namely, that photographing Muslims of different ages and backgrounds dressed in both contemporary clothes and in traditional Islamic attire might well be one way to alter the perception of Islam in the West.

“After a bit of a false start with this project,” Jangda told LIFE.com, “I realized that, ironically, I needed to show the stereotype [of how Muslims appear to Western eyes] in order to to battle that stereotype.

LIFE.com presents a selection of images from Jangda’s work-in-progress: The Muslim Behind Islam.

some really beautiful use of photography here


833 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#photography    #humanities    #islam    #middle east    

Uncontacted Peoples

Uncontacted peoples, also referred to as isolated peoples or lost tribes, are communities who live, or have lived, either by choice (peoples living in voluntary isolation) or by circumstance, without significant contact with globalised civilization.

Few people have remained totally uncontacted by modern civilization. Indigenous rights activists call for such groups to be left alone, stating that it will interfere with their right to self-determination.

Most uncontacted communities are located in densely forested areas in South America and New Guinea. Knowledge of the existence of these groups comes mostly from infrequent and sometimes violent encounters with neighbouring tribes, and from aerial footage. Isolated tribes may lack immunity to common diseases, which can kill 50 to 80 per cent of their people after contact.

Uncontacted tribes are a source of fascination in developed society, and the idea of tour operators offering extreme adventure tours to specifically search out uncontacted peoples has become controversial.A BBC Four documentary in 2006 documented a controversial American tour operator who specializes in escorted tours to “discover” uncontacted peoples in West Papua. similar to the BBC’s own adventure in Papua New Guinea to make their 1971 documentary A Blank on the Map in which the first contact in over a decade was made with the Biami people.


3 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#humanities    #culture    #anthropology    #aboriginal    
fuckyeahsouthasia:

The only living master of a dying martial art
A former factory worker from the British Midlands may be the last living master of the centuries-old Sikh battlefield art of shastar vidya. The father of four is now engaged in a full-time search for a successor.
The basis of shastar vidya, the “science of weapons” is a five-step movement: advance on the opponent, hit his flank, deflect incoming blows, take a commanding position and strike.
It was developed by Sikhs in the 17th Century as the young religion came under attack from hostile Muslim and Hindu neighbours, and has been known to a dwindling band since the British forced Sikhs to give up arms in the 19th Century.
Nidar Singh, a 44-year-old former food packer from Wolverhampton, is now thought to be the only remaining master. He has many students, but shastar vidya takes years to learn and a commitment in time and energy that doesn’t suit modern lifestyles.
“I’ve travelled all over India and I have spoken to many elders, this is basically a last-ditch attempt to flush someone out because if I die with it, it is all gone.”
Read more

fuckyeahsouthasia:

The only living master of a dying martial art

A former factory worker from the British Midlands may be the last living master of the centuries-old Sikh battlefield art of shastar vidya. The father of four is now engaged in a full-time search for a successor.

The basis of shastar vidya, the “science of weapons” is a five-step movement: advance on the opponent, hit his flank, deflect incoming blows, take a commanding position and strike.

It was developed by Sikhs in the 17th Century as the young religion came under attack from hostile Muslim and Hindu neighbours, and has been known to a dwindling band since the British forced Sikhs to give up arms in the 19th Century.

Nidar Singh, a 44-year-old former food packer from Wolverhampton, is now thought to be the only remaining master. He has many students, but shastar vidya takes years to learn and a commitment in time and energy that doesn’t suit modern lifestyles.

“I’ve travelled all over India and I have spoken to many elders, this is basically a last-ditch attempt to flush someone out because if I die with it, it is all gone.”

Read more


244 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#culture    #humanities    #anthropology    #sikhism    #martial arts    #shastar vidya    
vineetkaur:

Languages dying off around the globe
Only two people on Earth are known to speak the Ayapanec language, Manuel Segovia and Isidro Velasquez, old men of few words who are somewhat indifferent to each other’s company.
When Segovia and Velasquez pass away, their language also will go to the grave. It will mark the demise of a unique way of describing the lush landscape of southern Mexico and thinking about the world.
Ayapanec isn’t alone in its vulnerability. Some linguists say that languages are disappearing at the rate of two a month. Half of the world’s remaining 7,000 or so languages may be gone by the end of this century, pushed into disuse by English, Spanish and other dominating languages.
» via Anchorage Daily News

vineetkaur:

Languages dying off around the globe

Only two people on Earth are known to speak the Ayapanec language, Manuel Segovia and Isidro Velasquez, old men of few words who are somewhat indifferent to each other’s company.

When Segovia and Velasquez pass away, their language also will go to the grave. It will mark the demise of a unique way of describing the lush landscape of southern Mexico and thinking about the world.

Ayapanec isn’t alone in its vulnerability. Some linguists say that languages are disappearing at the rate of two a month. Half of the world’s remaining 7,000 or so languages may be gone by the end of this century, pushed into disuse by English, Spanish and other dominating languages.

» via Anchorage Daily News


2,443 notes | Reblog
2 years ago
#anthropology    #humanities    #language    #culture    #infographic    
lookhigh:

…the pace with which technology advances, and in particular, computing, memory, and data processing technology, is so amazingly fast (exponentially fast) that we will soon reach a point where machines will be able to emulate and quickly surpass the creative power of the human brain. Humanity will then reach a point of no return, whereby what we mean to be human will be no more: the singularity means the redefinition of our species, the creation of something else, possibly a hybrid of flesh and circuits, possibly simply circuits, dead matter imitating life in virtual animation….
 Humans, prepare for thy end is coming.
The date for the big change has been set for 2045.
Who Is Afraid Of The Singularity? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR

Given recent trends, I’m really not expecting the singularity any time in the next century, though I do believe we’ll be making impressive advancements in various areas. We’ll see.
I think before worrying about the singularity we need to worry about whether the massive climate shifts will let us live long enough to reach it.

lookhigh:

…the pace with which technology advances, and in particular, computing, memory, and data processing technology, is so amazingly fast (exponentially fast) that we will soon reach a point where machines will be able to emulate and quickly surpass the creative power of the human brain. Humanity will then reach a point of no return, whereby what we mean to be human will be no more: the singularity means the redefinition of our species, the creation of something else, possibly a hybrid of flesh and circuits, possibly simply circuits, dead matter imitating life in virtual animation….

 Humans, prepare for thy end is coming.

The date for the big change has been set for 2045.

Who Is Afraid Of The Singularity? : 13.7: Cosmos And Culture : NPR

Given recent trends, I’m really not expecting the singularity any time in the next century, though I do believe we’ll be making impressive advancements in various areas. We’ll see.

I think before worrying about the singularity we need to worry about whether the massive climate shifts will let us live long enough to reach it.


52 notes | Reblog
3 years ago
#Environment    #humanities    #robots    #science    #technology    #science sunday    
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